Place Works

India Flints textile practice seeks to articulate the cyclical connection between human existence and the patterns of nature. She researches traditional dye practices with old approaches being re-examined to generate more ecologically sustainable methods of production and uses indigenous plant forms and declared noxious weed. As the cloth absorbs colour from materials extracted from the landscape, so it becomes steeped in the landscape itself.

In contemporary 'Western' society, the course of life is no longer directed by seasons, planting and harvest. There was a time when these played dominant roles in life. When celebration and thanksgiving went hand in hand with the struggle for survival there was some comfort to be had from the repetition in the pattern. It may not be everyone's story, but only a few generations have elapsed in my family since such parallel threads could be traced, though in quite different countries and contexts.

These connections are articulated in my textile practice and informed by an ongoing examination of relationships to land and place. Traditional dye practice is researched, old approaches re-examined and applied in more ecologically sustainable ways, using indigenous plant forms and declared noxious weeds as well as specifically cultivated plants from the 470 acres of rural property near Mount Pleasant on the eastern escarpment of the Mount Lofty Ranges where I live.

From the complex and variable processes of felting, wrapping, bundling, stitching, layering and dyeing, works emerge that seek to speak contemplatively of stories and journeys. As the cloth absorbs colour from materials extracted from the landscape, so it becomes steeped in the landscape itself. Part of the land is taken away when the cloth is removed from the work site.

Support independent writing on the visual arts. Subscribe or donate here.