Current Issue - vol 34 no 1, 2014

Wall to wall: graffiti art

Co-guest editors Annemarie Kohn and Charity Bramwell

Wall to Wall offers readers a chance to compare their attitudes to graffiti art with those of a range of authorities from rappers and writers to scholars and critics.

The issue covers the birth of this art movement and subcultural genre in New York four decades ago and its current role within the constantly shifting politics of public space in cities across the planet including Asia and the Arab world where th...

Subscribe to the Artlink newsletter now

Current Features

Exhibitions to watch
More...

Reko Rennie
Reko Rennie is an interdisciplinary artist who explores his Aboriginal identity through contemporary mediums. He talks about his beginnings including being impressed at an early age by the work of How... More...

Nish Cash
Nish Cash is a graffiti artist based in Melbourne. She talks about how she got started writing graffiti and about the support offered by Ladie Killerz, (a national female graffiti event that happens a... More...

James Cochran
James Cochran, aka Jimmy C, (b. 1973) played a key role in the development of the underground graffiti movement in Australia during the early 1990s, and has a Masters degree in Visual Arts from the Un... More...

The hand that feeds: Graffiti and authenticity in contemporary brand culture
Artist and Digital Communications Officer at the University of Queensland Art Museum Sebastian Moody analyses about the co-option of graffiti art for commercial purposes and asks: 'Can we blame the ar... More...

The legitimate semantics of a subcultural Artform
Guest co-editor of WALL TO WALL Charity Bramwell explores the way culture acquires credibility through museums, publications, and the formation and deformation of art history canons.... More...

Protest and poetry: recent graffiti from the Arab world
Assistant Curator of Asian Art at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Tarun Nagesh reviews recent graffiti art in the Arab world, describing it as a powerful local tool as we... More...


Coming soon - new release e-book

Get a Life - an autobiographical anthology of theories
by Donald Brook


How do you describe a life which has been dedicated to unravelling the nature of art across time and space, and at the same time has been lived across several eras and regions, peopled by an array of players and life events well beyond a conventional comfort zone? Donald Brook’s new book Get a Life breaks the mould of the autobiographical genre, by combining his chronological life story with a selected anthology of his published essays, revealing the more than six decade evolution of his thinking about what art is. more...


 

The Artlink App

Digitally enhanced issues are now available for your smartphone, tablet and PC.

iTunes - http://bit.ly/19MaWSY

Google play - http://bit.ly/19MaRPj

Mac or PC - http://bit.ly/1gjsAHh

Indigenous Special Offers

Two value-packed special offers: the 3 highly acclaimed mega issues from 2011, 2012 & 2013 or a special 3 pack from 1990, 2000 & 2010 documenting Aboriginal and Torres Strait contemporary art. - Order now!


 

The Awful Truth About What Art Is

A groundbreaking book that proposes a radically new answer to the questions What is art? and How do we know whether something is a work of art?

Buy Donald Brook's book now.

or download the digital edition in the iTunes store


Artrave - Comment, upcoming events, people, news and views

- Optimism in Queensland Chris Saines, newly appointed Director of Queensland Art Gallery, has energy to burn and he has been talking about his vision for the institution for the next decade or more. His ambitions include increasing the footprint of QAGOMA within an expanded cultural precinct, and creating a permanent Indigenous gallery on th...
Read it now


Future Issues

Artlink Indigenous IV: Blackground

Issue 34#2 June 2014

Guest co-editors Carly Lane and Glenn Iseger-Pilkington

The fourth issue of Artlink Indigenous will turn its gaze to Indigenous lived experience and its salience to contemporary Indigenous art. The co-editors Carly Lane and Glenn Iseger-Pilkington write:  “Sharing these experiences is pivotal to the future of not only Indigenous people’s cultural independence, but also to the future of visual arts as expressive/ interrogative tools in which to share our cultures, concerns and aspirations.” More...